Top 25 National Parks in Washington DC

    Are you looking for a new vacation destination?

    Washington DC is a place that you should visit. It has history, culture, and natural beauty in it. You can explore the city on foot or by bike, see some of our world-class museums and galleries, or enjoy one of Washington DC’s outdoor activities like kayaking on the Potomac River.

    There are many things to do in Washington DC! There is something for everyone. For example, you can spend the day at a museum or go hiking through Rock Creek Park. Washington DC is the capital of America, which makes it a busy place. There are lots of places to explore. You can also eat delicious food there!

    1. Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument

    Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument

    The Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument is a place for women to learn about the struggles and accomplishments of U.S women’s suffrage, equal rights movements. The monument features historic houses that are situated on Capitol Hill with landmarks such as Smithsonian Castle behind it.

    On this monument, there are letters from Alice Paul to Eleanor Roosevelt about how she works for women’s equality. This is a place where you can learn and be inspired. It is important for everyone who believes that all genders deserve their dignity including those whose voices are not heard enough!

    Pets: You can bring your pet to the parking lot of the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument if you “keep it on a leash no longer than 6 feet at all times.” You should also put its name and address on its collar.

    Camping: If you are not allowed to camp at the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument, then you can explore feminist history.

    Tour: The Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument is a place where you can join a tour with a museum guide. You can also do other things like go to ranger-led programs. These activities are good for learning about women and equality in America.

    Entrance Fee: The monument has a free entrance fee, which makes it popular. It is a place where people can learn about women’s suffrage and the fight for gender equality across America.

    2. Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site

    Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site

    Carter G. Woodson wanted people who had been left out of textbooks to have their stories told for generations. He started a month to celebrate African-Americans and their accomplishments in schools, jobs, and culture.

    A man studied American history and civil rights activism. He was also interested in education reforms. He did this work at Howard University and helped establish their Department of Negro Education. Washington DC’s first public school system for black students was Woodrow Wilson High School. Then there is the Association For The Study Of Negro Life And History, which today is known as the National Association For Colored People or NAACP.

    Pets: The only pets that are allowed on the Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site are service animals or those that help someone who is disabled. And even then, they must be leashed in public areas of the property.

    Camping: Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site has campsites around it, but does not have any camping site of its own.

    Tour: This place is perfect for history buffs. The tour takes people through the different rooms of the home, telling stories about what has happened there. You can see old furniture and dishes that still people use today!

    Entrance Fee: Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site is a free national monument and historical site in the United States. It is located in Washington D.C.

    3. Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

    Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park

    The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal was a great invention. It changed how people could ship goods in America. Today, the canal is used by barges carrying coal or grain as well as boats for fun.

    This historic waterway is preserved so that future generations can enjoy it, and it has green space. People can visit the waterway and relax in nature. It’s also a great place for deer to come.

    Pets: The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park is a great place to spend time with your dog. You might walk the towpath, or you might eat lunch. But it’s important to remember that other people are there too!

    Camping: The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park has designated camping sites. People do not need permission from the park or to pay for a parking lot on the canal’s shoreline.

    Tour: The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park is a great place for many activities, such as boating, camping, fishing, hiking on the trails around Lake Needwood. You can also have picnics with your family.

    This historical site has a beautiful canal. People can walk along with it and learn about how people used it when the building was made. Visitors can also go to programs where they hear stories from people who live in America before this time.

    Entrance Fee: To enter the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, costs $5. It is a beautiful place with nature that has not been touched.

    4. Constitution Gardens

    Constitution Gardens

    In the center of a park called Constitution Gardens is a grassy area with chairs and tables. This is called the Golden Triangle. There are also fountains for people to cool off on hot days.

    The space is called “the golden triangle.” It’s a good place for barbecues or to sit in lawn chairs with friends and spend the day.

    Pets: You can take your pet with you to Constitution Gardens. They will be welcome at the National Mall and Memorial Gardens.

    Camping: Constitution Gardens is a park with no campgrounds and it is beautiful. There are many walking paths.

    Tour: The Korean, Lincoln, and Vietnam Veterans Memorials are not just for veterans. They are also because of Constitution Gardens. If you go to Constitution Gardens, you can learn about how history has shaped the United States.

    Entrance Fee: The Constitution Gardens are a place that everyone can visit. You do not have to pay to see them.

    5. Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial

    Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial

    The Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial is a tribute to the many successes of one of America’s most celebrated generals and Presidents, capturing both his military prowess and immense public service legacy in stone with 27 sculpted figures representing events from World War II through Ike’s two terms as president.

    The sculpture includes quotes by President John F Kennedy. The sculpture says that Ike was not only a great general but also a wise statesman. He knew how to lead this country out of political confusion.

    Pets: The Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Park is a place where you can bring your pet to get some exercise and enjoy the scenery together!

    Camping: The Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial is a park with no camping facilities or accommodations for visitors. But nearby campgrounds are easy to find on the internet.

    Tour: Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial is a place to learn about one of America’s greatest leaders in the 20th century. You can find out about his life and many accomplishments.

    Entrance Fee: On the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial, there is no fee for entrance and parking is free!

    6. Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site

    Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site

    Ford’s theater was an important building for Lincoln. People had performances there. But then, part of the theater collapsed and 22 people died. In 1968, the theater reopened after renovations were done to make it look like before the collapse happened.

    The 2000s saw another renovation. This made the landmark beautiful again. Now, you can explore what life was like in the 2000s by going through interactive exhibits.

    Pets: Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site does not allow pets to walk on their grounds.

    Camping: Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site is a place where Abraham Lincoln was killed. There are no hotels on the site, but nearby hotels can provide you with a place to sleep if you want it.

    Tour: The National Historic Park Rangers love history. They will teach you about it and share their knowledge with you. They do this in different ways, like living histories and informal interpretive experiences.

    You can also take a sleepover at Ford’s Theatre. You will be able to see actors who are dressed up like the people who were there when Lincoln was killed.

    Entrance Fee: Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site is open to the public and offers free admission.

    7. Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial

    Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial

    The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is a memorial to FDR. It is in Washington DC and it has four big pillars and two sculptures on top. The pillars stand at each corner of the monument and they represent peace and prosperity for all people.

    This is an impressive statue of President Roosevelt. It tells about his life, from when he was a child until when he died during World War II. It also has smaller statues that show some of the things that happened in his life, like when he became president before age 40 and was elected 4 times consecutively!

    Pets: The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial welcomes dogs. They can be on a leash.

    Camping: The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorials is a place everyone should see. You can camp nearby but there are lots of other things to do if you want to stay for the night.

    Tour: This memorial is a tribute to the man who led America through difficult times. You can become a Junior Ranger and help other people learn about this man. You can also take part in their program like war games!

    Entrance Fee: This is a memorial of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. People come from all over to visit this site because it’s free. They like to see the statue and the park.

    8. Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

    Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

    The Frederick Douglass National Historic Site is a place that is important for black people in America. When slaves ran away from their plantation, this was one of the places they could go to. They were able to be free and find refuge here.

    It is a website that helps people who are at their most vulnerable. It was started by heroes like Frederick Douglas, and it has been helpful in the past. But it will always be unfinished business because of attitudes like you have towards these matters. We don’t have time!

    Pets: The Frederick Douglass National Historic Site does not allow pets, but they can bring service animals.

    Camping: Frederick Douglass National Historic Site is not a good place to camp out with friends. The park does not allow camping and you will need to find somewhere else close by if that’s what you’re looking for.

    Tour: The Frederick Douglass National Historic Site is a museum, historic house, and heritage trail that you can explore while walking around. There are also parks and gardens for people to walk through. This is a great place!

    Entrance Fee: There is no entrance fee to the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site. You can tour the historic house by making a reservation. The price for each ticket is $1.00

    9. George Washington Memorial Parkway

    George Washington Memorial Parkway

    The George Washington Memorial Parkway is a 25-mile long parkway that goes along the south side of the Potomac River. It starts at Mount Vernon and ends in McLean.

    It’s called the scenic view of fishing boats in the river. It has been maintained for a long time and it is famous to locals and tourists. The view is always on, without fail or delay.

    Pets: Pets are not allowed on The George Washington Memorial Parkway. People try to sneak them into the car.

    Camping: There is no camping on the George Washington Memorial Parkway. But there are other places to camp that are beautiful.

    Tour: On the George Washington Memorial Parkway, you can do a lot of things for free. You can join their ranger program and other outdoor activities such as fishing or geocaching while listening to nature concerts on your way back home!

    Entrance Fee: When you go to the George Washington Memorial Parkway, America’s history is right there. It costs just $5 to get in.

    10. Korean War Veterans Memorial

    Korean War Veterans Memorial

    The Korean War Veterans Memorial is a place that pays respect to the people who fought in Korea. You can see statues of soldiers in various scenes from the war. One statue, “The Spirit of Sacrifice,” shows three soldiers marching through fire while there are exploding shells all around them.

    The memorial was built by President George H W Bush in 1992. It was built with two other sculptures next to it: the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army Monument and Vietnam Women’s Memorial Wall.

    Pets: The Korean War Veterans Memorial has some places where pets are allowed. You need to keep them on a leash or they will run away.

    Camping: The Korean War Veterans Memorial, There is no camping in the park.

    Tour: The Korean War Veterans Memorial is an outdoor memorial. The first part of the memorial, a triangular field with stainless steel statues and etched images on a reflective wall to represent all who served in uniform during the war, represents those that sacrificed their lives for freedom from oppression.

    This space has an open area. It is a park with benches and trees. People can sit on the benches and think, or people who are in the military can remember how they died.

    Entrance Fee: Korean War Veterans Memorial is open to the public, and there are no fees or reservations.

    11. Lincoln Memorial

    Lincoln Memorial

    Abraham Lincoln was one of the most honored presidents in American history. He was a good leader and helped our country. His memorial is a place to celebrate him and all he accomplished for America’s future generations.

    This memorial is at the western end of Washington D.C. It has pillars that reach high into the sky. It looks like a temple, and it reminds me of temples I have seen in pictures of Greece or around buildings where they worship Zeus!

    Pets: There is a memorial for Abraham Lincoln. It welcomes pets and has been designated as an official pet-friendly space by city officials.

    Camping: There is no parking in the park. Campers should be careful because you cannot sleep at night or camp anywhere inside the state’s biggest natural area.

    Tour: The schedule of events for the Lincoln Memorial is on the National Mall and Memorial Park’s website. So you can plan to visit all of these places in Washington D.C.

    Entrance Fee: The Lincoln Memorial is the most visited building in Washington. People come to see it every year and it is free to visit. It doesn’t matter if you live here or not, you can still go!

    12. Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac

    Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac

    Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac is a presidential memorial. It has two parts: monuments, sculptures, and planes on Columbia Island in Washington D.C., and programs to promote public education about American presidents (and other governmental figures).

    It is Grove on The Potomac commemorates the U.S. president from 1963-1969 with sketches drawn by Jackie Kennedy Onassis herself!

    Pets: Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac is a popular destination for people and their pets. There is one exception–service animals are not allowed at ranger-led events. Your pet can come as long as they don’t cause any disruptions in programing or park activities.

    Camping: Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac is a beautiful and secluded area that many people visit. There are bathrooms, trails, benches, and picnic tables here but there are no accommodations for campers.

    Tour: In the Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove on the Potomac, you can do things that are outside like biking, kayaking, and canoeing. If these outdoor activities aren’t your thing then you can just walk or go watch wildlife.

    Entrance Fee: Lyndon Baines Johnson Memorial Grove is a place to see. It’s free and it is near Washington DC on the Potomac River.

    13. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial

    Martin Luther King, Jr. Memoria

    When you walk into Washington, DC, you will feel the weight of history. It’s hard to believe that MLK Jr.’s legacy lives on so strongly there today. There is a memorial (an inscription of “I Have A Dream” speech) for him at the Martin Luther King Memorial with a statue by Lei Yixin.

    This monument was made for people who want to honor a historical figure. It looks like any other monument at first, but when you get closer, there is something special about it that is different.

    Pets: The Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial does not allow pets on the memorial grounds. You can only have a service animal here without exception.

    Camping: The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is a new monument that is in a park. The park has rules that say you cannot camp there or stay overnight.

    Tour: As you walk around the Martin Luther King, Jr. memorial in Washington D.C., you will see quotes from his life and a sculpture of one of the leaders in civil rights. You will also have views of cherry trees and the Tidal Basin as well as an expansive bookstore that offers ranger-led programs on weekdays or weekends!

    Entrance Fee: The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is a place where people can visit without needing to pay or make reservations first.

    14. Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site

    Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site

    The Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site is a place where you can see the home of the great woman. It is in Washington, D.C., but it has an emotional connection for me because I grew up near there and my mom still lives there now!

    This house got 2 designations: the DC Inventory of Historic Sites and Properties (1976) and the National Register of Historic Places (1978). You can go on tours or watch a video about her life.

    Pets: The Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site does not charge a fee for pets.

    Camping: The National Park Service runs the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House in Miami, Florida. There is no camping on-site, but there are other campsites nearby where people can camp and do different activities while they’re not touring this historic building!

    Tour: The Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site is a great place to learn about black people and how they lived. The site educates visitors on Mrs. Bethune’s life, as well as her work with the NCNW (National Council of Negro Women).

    Entrance Fee: The Mary McLeod Bethune Council House is a free historic site that tells the story of one woman’s journey.

    15. National Capital Parks

    National Capital Parks

    National Capital Parks is a place where they preserve and protect important locations in the United States. There are buildings, for instance, President Lincoln’s Cottage or George Washington Carver Memorial Park at Tuskegee University. This is so that future generations will have access to these spaces.

    It is a unit created by Congress with help from Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II. This was because many Americans were fighting in the war, and they needed some way to protect their homes while they were gone.

    Pets: You can bring your dog or other pet to the National Capital Parks. You need to make sure you are on a leash.

    Camping: National Capital Parks is a good place to go for an afternoon walk or a picnic. But there are no campsites here.

    Tour: National Capital Park offers a lot of different parks, including one that is only two miles away from your house. Come explore the beautiful area!

    Entrance Fee: National Capital Parks entrance fees are free. You will get to see some of the most beautiful views in Washington D.C., including a few statues from Alexander Hamilton, Margaret Sanger, George Mason among others!

    16. National Mall

    National Mall

    The Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument are just two of the many landmarks. They are on a really long grassy area called the National Mall.

    Washington, D.C. has a lot of museums. The Smithsonian is near the Capitol building and the White House is on its north side. When you are not looking at the monuments, you can look around at other things. You could see people running or walking. There will be people standing with groups of students who are teaching them about something. All while there are cherry blossom trees that start to bloom every year during Springtime.

    Pets: You can bring your dog to the National Mall with you. The National Mall is a place where dogs are allowed. You should take your dog on walks past the monuments and memorials. Tidal Basin is also a good place to go because it has cherry blossoms and trees for taking photos!

    Camping: Camping is forbidden in most parks on the National Mall.

    Tour: The National Mall is in the middle of America. It has a park that goes for miles with buildings and opportunities to play. There are also programs where people who work at the mall give tours and talk about what you can do there too.

    Entrance Fee: There are no fees to enter National Mall and Memorial Parks. It is a popular destination for tourists, as it has hundreds of attractions including its famous Smithsonian museums.

    17. Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site

    Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site

    The Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site is a street in Washington DC. It goes from Constitution Ave to 3rd Street. Established in 1965, the site preserves many spots along this road that are important for American histories such as Wall Street and The White House.

    You can see these buildings up close with a tour guide or you can explore on your own by taking one of many self-guided walking routes to learn about all there is to discover at each stop.

    Pets: Pets are allowed at the Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site. They can’t go in any of the buildings, but they can go where people park their cars and to the picnic tables.

    Camping: Pennsylvania Ave is a place to camp while you explore Washington D.C. It has lots of things for you to do while you are there. You can make your way over and get all the fun things that this historic site has in store for you!

    Tour: You can explore Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site to find out more about the program where you are allowed to observe presidential inaugurations. You will be able to see history happen at this location that preserves important locations related to the creation of Federal City and historically significant events.

    Additionally, we have programs that can explain how we preserved these areas. We did this for people who accomplished a lot 200 years ago.

    Entrance Fee: The entrance to the Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site is free, so you can explore the birthplace of our democracy for a long time.

    18. Rock Creek Park

    Rock Creek Park

    Rock Creek Park is a very large park. It stretches across the Northwest part of Washington, D.C. and it was created by an Act of Congress in 1890. The National Park Service takes care of it now.

    This park has over 1,000 acres for you to walk on and explore. There are also different features like fishing piers or boat rentals. You can go near tidal pools or a boating lake. The horseback riding courses will make your heart beat faster!

    Pets: Pets must be watched all the time when they are on a leash. Otherwise, they could get lost or hurt. If you have a pet, watch them closely.

    Camping: Rock Creek Park is a home for many animals. You should not go into the plants and trees. If you do, you might get hurt. Other visitors will be hurt too!

    Tour: Rock Creek Park is a great place to go and have fun. You can fish, hike, bike, or join rangers. You might want to play games inside the visitor’s center, too. And if you want to help people in the park, even more, you can volunteer!

    Entrance Fee: The entrance to Rock Creek Park is free. There are many ways you can enjoy the beauty of this place.

    19. Theodore Roosevelt Island

    Theodore Roosevelt Island

    Theodore Roosevelt Island is a memorial for President Teddy Roosevelt and was originally named My Lord’s Island. It has had many names but it was finally renamed after President Teddy himself died.

    The island was home to black troops during the Civil War. They trained here amid camps for other black people who were slaves. People could escape when they were not able to get off of the island or free themselves from Union soldiers.

    Pets: There is a park in Washington DC, the Theodore Roosevelt Island, where you can bring your pet. You do not need to worry about this because they are allowed if they are not assistance dogs and don’t interfere with ranger programs.

    Camping: Theodore Roosevelt Island is a park in Washington, D.C., that has beautiful views of the Potomac River and the George Washington Monument. But you cannot camp there!

    Tour: Theodore Roosevelt Island is a place where people enjoy the outdoors. They can paddle in the water, take guided tours of the island’s wildlife and vegetation, or just hike its trails.

    Entrance Fee: Theodore Roosevelt Island is a free place to explore if you want to walk on the water. It’s a peaceful place without an entrance fee.

    20. Thomas Jefferson Memorial

    Thomas Jefferson Memorial

    The Jefferson Memorial is a building in Washington, D.C., built to honor the Father of our Country and his contributions to this great country’s history as well as its present-day democracy.

    The memorial symbolizes that all those who are willing will work together for what they believe in no matter their position or social standing.

    Pets: The Jefferson Memorial is a place where people can learn about history. Dogs are allowed on leashes.

    Camping: A family-friendly campground, the Jefferson Memorial Forest has 7 campsites for tents. They also have 4 campsites near nature trails that are perfect for walking or biking.

    Tour: Jefferson Memorial Forest is a good place for families to camp. Some rangers lead programs. If you’re feeling restless, there are trails for walking or running and many people have picnics while they’re here.

    Entrance Fee: Visitors to the Thomas Jefferson Memorial can enter and view various exhibits for free.

    21. Vietnam Veterans Memorial

    Vietnam Veterans Memorial

    The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a place that honors some of the U.S soldiers who died when they protected our country from communism.

    The wall itself displays nearly 60K names and has become one of America’s most powerful symbols since its unveiling on November 13th, 1982 by President Reagan as he said “What this black granite does say will never be erased.”

    Pets: No dogs are allowed at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial as per U.S Department of Veteran Affairs regulations. People who served in Vietnam can visit there and remember their friends.

    Camping: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a good place to spend the day. There are no public camping spots or other places to sleep, but there are lots of things you can do there that will keep you busy all day long!

    Tour: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a memorial for soldiers who died during and after the war. You can remember those people on the wall, look at three statues that were made of soldiers, read plaques about people you have lost since then, or talk to women who were fighting there too!

    Entrance Fee: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is more than just a memorial to those who died in the war. It also has statues and it’s free for anyone to see, no matter what they think about the war.

    22. Washington Monument

    Washington Monument

    The Washington Monument is tall in our capital city. It was built to honor George Washington because he led the army in many battles and became the first president of America after it became independent from England.

    A woman named Eliza Brown Walter donated money to the construction of this landmark. She heard a speech about abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison at her church on July 4th, 1847.

    Pets: You can’t bring your pet into buildings like museums, but you can walk them on a leash. It’s ok to have your pet by your side as long as they are clean and leashed.

    Camping: Youth groups can reserve campsites at the Washington Monument. You can pick from a variety of types of sites, including lakeside and wooded areas that provide shelter in bad weather.

    Tour: The best time to go to the Washington Monument is when you get on an elevator and take the trip up. You will see a view of everything in DC, including Virginia. There are 193 Commemorative Stones set into walls – but only if you’re going down!

    Entrance Fee: You can visit the Washington Monument for free. But you will have to pay 1 dollar. It’s a convenience fee.

    23. White House

    White House

    The White House is a historical landmark that has been home to every president since John Adams. It now stands as an icon for democracy. It was first built in 1801 by James Hoban to serve as a home for President George Washington after he left his Virginia plantation at Mount Vernon, and it used to be a palace.

    Architect Edward Clarke Cabot created many features for the home. He made sure that there were large windows in rooms that face south where it is sunny during the summer so they can be used all year without heating or cooling costs.

    Pets: Pets can go with you to the White House, but they need to be on a leash. They can roam in President’s Park but not inside of the Visitor Center.

    Camping: The White House Campsite offers lots of different places for people to camp. There are walk-in tent campsites and campsites for RVs and trailers where you can also set up a tent.

    Tour: The White House is a place for many events. You can join an Easter Egg Roll, Garden Tour, Christmas Tree Lighting, or explore the president’s park by being a volunteer.

    Entrance Fee: No fee is required for this tour, which takes visitors through the East Wing of the White House.

    24. World War I Memorial

    World War I Memorial

    The National World War I Memorial is a national memorial commemorating the service rendered by members of the United States Armed Forces in World War I.

    In 2015, the National Defense Authorization Act authorized a commission to build this monument. It was built near John J. Pershing General of Armies monument because he led troops through France during WWI and became our first Commander-in-Chief on American soil!

    Pets: Visitors to the National World War I Memorial should never leave their pets unattended! Pets are allowed on exterior grounds but must be under the control of their owner.

    Camping: The National World War I Memorial the park does not have any camping facilities or accommodations, visitors can search on Google for local campgrounds near the park.

    Tour: The National World War I Memorial is an epic journey through the time in America that changed everything. It shares stories about courage, honor, patriotism, and sacrifice to help people understand what it was like then.

    Entrance Fee: The National World War I Memorial entrance fee is $10 or $18. It’s a good investment because of the experience you have at the memorial.

    25. World War II Memorial

    World War II Memorial

    A memorial is a place for people to go when they are thinking about those who served in World War II. It has 17 slabs of stone in it representing America’s history from its founding to the present day. The Memorial was designed by artist Maya Lin.

    The memorial pays tribute to people who fought in World War II. If they didn’t fight, then we wouldn’t be free today. The Memorial is also a reminder of how fragile our freedom can be if we give it up easily without thinking too much about it.

    Pets: Dogs are not allowed in the World War II Memorial. But they can roam freely on The National Mall.

    Camping: The World War II Memorial Camping has a great location near the monument. It has many amenities. Just search for information to find out more!

    Tour: The World War II Memorial has 3 of the most popular walking tours. These are the National Mall Tour, National Mall and Tidal Basin Tour, and Memorials And Moonlight Tours. You can also join a ranger talk to learn more about these tours.

    Entrance Fee: You can visit the World War II Memorial. There is no charge to do this and it will be a great experience for you, your family, and everyone there!

    Washington, DC is a vibrant city that offers interesting experiences for every type of traveler.

    Washington, D.C. is a good place to learn about America’s history and government because there are many famous sites in Washington, D.C., such as the White House and the Lincoln Memorial. There is also great food and art!

    So if you’re looking for an exciting new destination with something for everyone, we hope our guide will inspire your next adventure here.

    It doesn’t matter if your interests lean towards history or culture; Washington D.C.’s got something for everyone!