Top 15 National Parks in Massachusetts

    Are you looking for an adventure in Massachusetts?

    Many people want to visit Massachusetts. It has beautiful places like historic sites, natural wonders, and world-class universities. One way to see all the good things is by visiting one or more of its 15 National Parks. Here are some reasons why you should take your family on a trip through New England and enjoy these amazing parks!

    There is an adventure in every turn. There are beautiful landscapes, rich history, and diverse wildlife.

    1. Adams National Historical Park

    Adams National Historical Park

    Adams National Historical Park is a place where you can learn about the lives of U.S Presidents John Adams and his son John Quincy Adams, as well as Henry and Brooks Adams. You can also go inside some buildings that are historic to see what life was like in the past.

    The home was occupied by five generations of the family. It was made for a party in 1893. There was an army captain named Charles Francis who served there for a while. He also went to Great Britain and became president after McKinley got killed.

    Pets: Pets are not allowed in this national park. But service animals are!

    Camping: At Adams National Park, there are no campsites or restaurants. But it is an interesting place with a good view of the Appalachian Mountains and a rich history that goes back to 1791!

    Tour: Adams National Historical Park has a calendar of events. You can enjoy the 13 acres of land that reflect four generations’ worth of Adams family values and lifestyles. If you are looking for an art class, you can find it here too.

    Entrance Fee: The entrance fee to Adams National Historical Park is $15.00 per person if you want a 7-day pass. It can only be used by one person at a time.

    2. Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park

    Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park

    Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park is a great place to go for people who love nature, history, or just some fresh air. In this park, America started making things with steam power!

    This is a place where people can see how our country was when it first started making things. It is made up of two places, one that shows what life was like in the 1800s and another that has the same thing today.

    Pets: The Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park is a great place for pets. You can take them on the trail, but you must keep them leashed so they do not get into accidents with other people or wildlife in the area.

    Camping: The Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park is home to a wealth of unique and beautiful landscapes. However, if you are looking for an overnight stay in the park there are other nearby campsites that allow you to enjoy some great trails nearby! There’s also plenty of camping just outside these gorgeous hiking spots; towns such as Mendon offer to lodge while connected with this historical corridor through extensive roads.

    Tours: Experience the rich history and natural beauty of Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park with our self-guided walking tours. Learn about how this beautiful area was shaped by its people, both Native Americans, and settlers alike!

    Entrance Fee: The Park Service Rangers offer a variety of free, fun activities for the whole family to enjoy.

    3. Boston African American National Historic Site

    Boston African American National Historic Site

    Boston, Massachusetts has a place in the heart of its Beacon Hill neighborhood. There are 15 buildings from before the Civil War that show Boston’s African-American history.

    This society was once very popular. People lived in their homes, went to churches, schools and medical facilities. Picturesque surroundings show the past world that people had long ago.

    Pets: This park welcomes pets. But they will have to be on a leash and you will need to clean up after them.

    Camping: Camping is not allowed at the Boston African American National Historic Site. But if you go to The North Slope of Beacon Hill, it will call out to you and then you can explore a part of Boston’s culture.

    Tour: The Boston African American National Historic Site has things for kids to do. Become a Junior Ranger and explore the Black Heritage Trail. At Rocking The Cradle Town Meeting, you will learn about black history in America.

    Entrance Fee: Adults pay $10 for admission to Boston African American National Historic Site. Students and Seniors pay $8.00. Members are free. Children 12 and under are free.

    4. Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area

    Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area

    The Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area is a place for people to go and explore. There are 34 small islands that you can visit and it has trails.

    This island attracts people from all over the world. The island was once a landfill. In 1982, it became part of the beautiful recreational area on Boston’s East Coast seaboard. This is where 350 years of Boston’s history can be seen by visitors at their leisure.

    Pets: All of your favorite pets are welcome at National Park Islands, but they must be leashed.

    Camping: The Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area is a good place for people who want to do outdoor things. The place has four islands: Peddocks, Bumpkin, Grape and Lovells islands.

    Tour: If you are visiting Boston, you can go to an amazing place where you can walk around and visit historic sites. You can explore tide pools or hike lush trails on 34 islands. Youth programs are offered in the area so that your trip is unforgettable!

    Entrance fee: The park has many free activities. You need to make reservations beforehand, but it can be worth it for an escape from everyday life.

    5. Boston National Historical Park

    Boston National Historical Park

    The Boston National Historical Park is a place where you can learn about New England’s past. In one day, you can explore the Freedom Trail and hear all about Paul Revere’s ride from Old North Church in 1775.

    Visitors will be able to see Samuel Adams’ house and hear about what life was like back then. The people they’ll meet may tell them how Harvard University helped provide food for the colonists by using their own symbiotic farming system.

    Pets: The Boston National Historical Park is a historical place that highlights many important events in American history. Pets are allowed as long as they are on a leash, but they will be turned away at any entrance to buildings because it is for safety reasons and for cleanliness.

    Camping: The park is a good place to go if you’re in the middle of a bustling city. You can enjoy all the natural beauty.

    Tour: There are free ranger-led tours about Boston’s history. You can take these tours and learn how important Boston’s history is.

    Entrance Fee: There are no admission fees at the federally or municipally owned historic sites in Boston National Historical Park. This includes Faneuil Hall, Bunker Hill Monument, and Dorchester Heights Monument.

    6. Cape Cod National Seashore

    Cape Cod National Seashore

    John F. Kennedy was president for less than a year before he was assassinated in 1963. He loved nature and he wanted to make something that would honor him and his love of nature.

    He made Cape Cod National Seashore on August 7th, 1961. It is 42 thousand acres and became America’s first national seascape. And it has some interesting wildlife too, like migratory birds who come back every year. They all greet each other in the summer and then migrate southbound in the winter.

    Pets: The Cape Cod National Seashore is a place for dogs to enjoy the sand and surf. Dogs can go on more beaches than just the lifeguard-protected ones. They must be on a leash that is 6 feet long and they have to stay leashed at all times.

    Camping: You cannot go camping at Cape Cod National Seashore, but there are other places nearby that you can go to camp. Such as Nickerson State Park and Wellfleet Hollow Campground.

    Tour: Cape Cod National Seashore is a place where people can have fun. You can do many things there like go to the beach and see lighthouses. It has six beaches, as well as, plenty of attractions for you to explore. Let’s look at what each town offers in terms of attractions that are sure to suit your interests!

    Entrance Fee: The National Park Service announced that Cape Cod’s beloved coastline will have a difficult situation this upcoming season. The annual fee for entering the parks will increase from $20 to $25, which is guaranteed to make visiting more of an ordeal than usual!

    7. Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site

    Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site

    Frederick L. Olmsted was an American landscape architect and the nation’s foremost park maker. He designed some of the most famous parks in America, like Central Park in New York City. For his first work, he made a park for an industrialist who wanted to have a view from afar. The National Historic Site has two major creations. One is from 1860 and the other is from 1908.

    This man was a designer in the 1800s. He designed parks like Central Park in New York City. His best work at this park made people happy because it had walks and landscapes for people to enjoy.

    Pets: Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site in Brookline, Massachusetts is open to dogs that are leashed. They can explore all the outside areas. But they cannot go in the buildings or parking lots.

    Camping: Frederick Law Olmsted National Historical Site is a good place for anyone to spend some time in beautiful nature. If you want to stay near Boston, consider the Hanscom AFB FamCamp. It is just outside of Bedford and has everything you need like hookups.

    Tour: Meet Frederick Olmstead and join the Junior Rangers at this historic site. Join a ranger-guided tour to learn about his life, walk in his footsteps through restored landscapes, or experience special events like Summer Camp!

    Entrance Fee: Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site is a free park.

    8. John F. Kennedy National Historic Site

    John F. Kennedy National Historic Site

    It is strange that the home of America’s most celebrated president is in this quiet, suburban enclave. The house itself has been preserved to show how Kennedy lived with his family when he was growing up and features many historical artifacts from JFK’s life.

    The John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site is a very important landmark for people who like American history. It was the place where President Kennedy went before he died. He went there to play baseball on Cape Cod Bay, but one day tragedy struck and he died.

    Pets: The John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site is not for pets. You can’t leave your pet alone, so you need to take care of it yourself when visiting.

    Camping: The John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site has seen a lot of history, but it is not open to camping.

    Tour: Join a ranger on this tour of Boston and the early years that shaped John F. Kennedy’s legacy. You will learn about JFK’s family history, see where he spent his formative childhood moments, and explore North End sites associated with the Kennedy clan–including Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy’s birthplace.

    Entrance Fee: Admission to the John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site is free.

    9. Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site

    Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site

    This house looks like a normal colonial house. But on September 17th of 1859, General George Washington walked into the room! He looked like he was the owner of the house.

    This passage is about Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s house and also where General George Washington used this space during America’s Revolutionary War.

    Pets: Pets can go in some places but not others at this historic estate. Service animals can go anywhere in the house, and pets are allowed to walk around the formal garden where visitors are also allowed.

    Camping: Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site is a great place to camp if you want to be surrounded by nature. There are many places nearby where you can go camping, like on farms or near brooks with small cute cabins and trailers.

    Tour: Join a ranger at Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site for an exploration of the lesser-known stories, Longfellow family anecdotes, and more! This event is limited to 15 visitors.

    Entrance Fee: This is a historic site that offers tours and programs. You do not need to pay an entrance fee to visit!

    10. Lowell National Historical Park

    Lowell National Historical Park

    Lowell National Historical Park includes many sites in the city related to the Industrial Revolution. It was established in 1978.

    We have a mill that is open to the public. There are other buildings like houses too. These buildings show what life was really like back then. In 2019, the Beautiful Quarter series was included at this site in Massachusetts!

    Pets: If you want to take your dog out for a walk, make sure that they are on their leash. They can’t go inside any buildings. And when they do their business, make sure you pick it up.

    Camping: The Lowell National Historical Park is not allowed, but there are many campgrounds near the city of Lowell.

    Tour: The Lowell National Historical Park has places to learn and explore. You can go to the Boott Cotton Mills Museum, Mogan Cultural Center, or walk on the Northern Canal Walkway that remains from Lowell’s industrial past.

    Entrance Fee: There is a tourist destination in Lowell, Massachusetts. It has an entrance fee that ranges from $12-$10 depending on your age.

    11. Minute Man National Historical Park

    Minute Man National Historical Park

    Minute Man National Historical Park does not only commemorate the opening battle of the American Revolutionary War.

    It also has a house from the 18th century. It was built by John Thoreau and he lived there with his dad Henry David Thoreau. And Nathaniel Hawthorne’s son Julian also lived in it.

    Pets: There are pets of all sizes and shapes at Minute Man National Historical Park in Concord Massachusetts.

    Camping: Minute Man National Historical Park is a great place to go camping. There are many campsites, and it also has hiking trails and animals.

    Tour: A visit to Minute Man National Historical Park is never dull! There are guided programs every Spring, Summer, and Fall that offer visitors a chance to learn about the history of this important site.

    Entrance Fee: There is no fee to come into the park, so enjoy the beautiful place.

    12. New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park

    New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park

    The National Park Service is always looking for ways to teach people about the past. They have made it their mission in New Bedford, Massachusetts to preserve America’s history of whaling by creating a new national park with old buildings from that time.

    You can look at pictures and videos of people’s lives on these ships. People will show you how to do things that they used to do.

    Pets: Pets are allowed in the New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park. There is no extra fee like other parks usually have.

    Camping: You can go to New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park. It has a campsite that is big and will have room for all your friends and family. That place is perfect if you want to get away from your life for a while!

    Tour: New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park has been home to many people who have exciting stories. You can explore the city on your own, or go on a tour with a ranger to learn about whalers, sailors, and factory workers – all those who have called New Bedford home!

    Entrance Fee: The New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park entrance fee is $19 for adults, $17 for seniors, and only $12 for students. It’s a great place to go to see what life was like back in the 1800s.

    13. Salem Maritime National Historic Site

    Salem Maritime National Historic Site

    The Salem Maritime National Historic Site is the first of its kind in America. The site has 12 historic structures, one replica tall-ship, and 9 acres along the waterfront on a harbor that was important for trade during Colonial times.

    A long time ago, people who lived in this place forgot about it. But over thirty years ago, it became a very popular place called New England’s most exciting destination after being restored to its original glory through the efforts of many preservation groups.

    Pets: You can bring your pet to the grounds of the Salem Maritime National Historic Site. But they are not allowed inside any buildings. And your pet should never be left alone or tied up while you explore!

    Camping: Salem Maritime National Historic Site is a good place for lunchtime picnics. Pack out your trash when you are done. You can also stay there in a campsite if you want to be outside.

    Tour: People who come to Salem Maritime National Historic Site can learn about America’s maritime history. They can explore historic buildings, take a boat tour and see exhibits.

    Entrance Fee: No entrance fee is required to see the historic buildings and ships.

    14. Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site

    Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site

    The Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site is a very special place. Built in 1646, this site was the first integrated ironworks on North American soil and has been preserved to show an important part of our history that we sometimes forget.

    The Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site is not just any old museum. It offers you a chance to see what life was like during colonial times when people needed metal manufacturing for military weapons or tools on farms.

    Pets: Dogs can come visit the Saugus Ironworks. But they must be on a leash and cannot go inside of buildings.

    Camping: There are campsites near Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site. You can sleep on the ground and watch stars. They twinkle and make you feel good.

    Tour: This place has nature trails and other fun things to explore. You can also do a self-guided tour with an audio component if you want to see more of the place. Or you can find your “virtual” park to become a bark ranger!

    Entrance Fee: Saugus Iron Works does not charge to enter. They have many educational programs that are free.

    15. Springfield Armory National Historic Site

    Springfield Armory National Historic Site

    The Springfield Armory is a popular place for people who like guns. A lot of people go there because they want to know more about the guns that were made. And it’s also a museum with lots of things to see.

    The armory was built when people fought with Britain. It was close to Boston. So the guns that were made there would be used against the British troops. Then it got unsafe for them after 1775 because they weren’t safe anymore.

    Pets: Pets are allowed in the area, but you cannot bring pets with you into the museum.

    Camping: This is a campground. It has lots of fun things for kids to do including golf karts, playgrounds with slides, swingsets and monkey bars. You can go camping here with your family and bring your pets too.

    Tour: Springfield National Historic Site is a place where you can visit the Springfield Museum. You can also explore the grounds and even take a walk behind Quarters 1. There are also picnic areas so you can go camping with your friends or family, so make sure to bring tents!

    Entrance Fee: Springfield Armory National Historic Site is a federal property where you can visit for free.

    Massachusetts is a state that has many things for people of all ages. People can stay by the beach and relax, or they can go hiking in the mountains. There are many choices in this beautiful part of New England.

    The 15 national parks in America are different. They are special places. If you visit one of them, you might have an adventure and see the natural beauty that is different than other places. It’s not enough time to see everything there!