Top 22 National Park in New York

    Are you looking for a new adventure? Do you want to explore the beauty of New York?

    The National Park in New York is a great place to start. You will get to see the beautiful landscapes and you can also enjoy many adventures in this area. There is something for everyone there!

    Come to New York! It’s waiting for you with open arms and it has everything ready for your visit. You won’t regret coming to the national park. Come now!

    1. African Burial Ground National Monument

    African Burial Ground National Monument

    African Burial Ground National Monument is a monument. It is in the Civic Center section of Lower Manhattan, New York City.

    Ted Weiss Federal Building 290 Broadway is the main building. There are plaques inside that honor the people buried there, including Crispus Attucks. He was killed in Boston on March 5th, 1770 while trying to help people escape British troops.

    Pets: African Burial Ground National Monument is a place to honor the people who helped make our country. Pets are not allowed here unless they are service animals.

    Camping: African Burial Ground is a historic site in New York City. It is near the Hudson River. There are no RV campgrounds nearby but people can come and see these memorial grounds or exhibitions inside.

    Tour: African Burial Ground National Monument is a place for people to go. They can learn about the past. There are drums and dancing performances that happen there too.

    Entrance Fee: This National Monument does not charge an admission fee. If you are looking for free family fun, it is a good place to go.

    2. Castle Clinton National Monument

    Castle Clinton National Monument

    Castle Clinton is a fort that was built to protect people. It is in Battery Park and it has had two times when prisoners lived there. They were prisoners during World War I and again during World War II.

    This island was an immigration station. More than 8 million people came to the United States by being processed here between 1855 and 1890. Now it is mostly used by tourists who come in on cruise ships that dock nearby.

    Pets: Castle Clinton National Monument does not allow pets.

    Camping: Castle Clinton is in Manhattan. This makes it hard to find RV camping nearby.

    Tour: You can go to Castle Clinton National Monument and take a tour. You can also do outdoor things like kayaking, biking, fishing tours, or walking.

    Entrance Fee: Castle Clinton National Monument is a place for everyone to visit. It’s free!

    3. Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site

     Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site

    Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site is a place for those who want to learn about America’s first lady, Eleanor.

    Val-Kill is a beautiful place where you can walk and have fun. You can even see the view of the Hudson River. It has a garden and FDR’s study.

    Pets: You and your pets can walk around the developed areas and gardens at Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site.

    Camping: Camping is not allowed at Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site. But you can go to a place nearby and camp there overnight or for two nights.

    Tour: Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site is a place where you can learn about Eleanor, who was one of our most inspirational women. You can visit Val-Kill and see her home. You can also see exhibits about women’s rights that she was interested in, or you can walk through Top Cottage Trail and learn more about how she spent time at Sagamore Hill.

    Entrance Fee: The Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site is free for the first trial. The FDR Presidential Library/Museum costs money. For anyone 62 years old and up, it is $6 per person.

    4. Federal Hall National Memorial

    Federal Hall National Memorial

    Federal Hall is a building in the Financial District of New York City. It was built in 1703 and it still stands today!

    The Treasury Department was used for many purposes in the 1800s. One of those is when Congress members were there up to 1812 when they moved across the street. Alexander Hamilton ran his Treasury Department from 1789-1795 before he died on November 24th after a duel with Aaron Burr over corruption allegations.

    Pets are not allowed in public buildings. You can still see the beautiful views of the city from outside and on top of Federal Hall.

    Camping: You can find campsites near the Federal Hall National Memorial. George Washington’s inauguration was there and it is a memorial for him.

    Tour: Federal Hall National Memorial has information about the first president of the United States. People can see a Bible that was used for the first inauguration and they can look out at New York Harbor and Wall Street from an observation balcony. People can also join a Junior Ranger program while visiting!

    Entrance Fee: You don’t need to pay an entrance fee at this landmark. George Washington took his oath of office here.

    5. Fire Island National Seashore

    Fire Island National Seashore

    Fire Island National Seashore is a place that people want to go to. It has many different animals. Birds like to fly in the trees on your way there, and seals like swimming near the beaches around it. There is something for every person!

    This 26-mile long barrier island is home to some pretty cool things like fireflies and cliffs. People walk on the roads and see the waves crash. Sometimes they fish at sea for a day and go back in late.

    Pets: Fire Island is a great place for your pet. Pets can go to many places there, and you need to bring water for them and take care of them when it is hot.

    Camping: In Fire Island National Seashore, there are east and west wilderness campsites. Watch Hill is a place where people can walk to these campsites. There is also Smith Point County Park. It’s a good place for campers to stay during their trip!

    Tour: The Fire Island National Seashore is a popular location to explore nature and animals. There are many trails for hiking and sightseeing, like the Sunken Forest or Talisman. These places have historical significance because they have been inhabited by different cultures throughout time.

    Entrance Fee: Fire Island National Seashore is a great place to explore. You don’t need to pay, but you might if you want to get more places.

    6. Fort Stanwix National Monument

    Fort Stanwix National Monument

    Fort Stanwix National Monument is a place where you can learn about history. It’s near Rome. There were Americans and they won the battle in 1777. General Burgoyne surrendered, so there was no more fighting. You will also see how life was like for George Washington’s army when they took command of this fort. They were making a plan to take New York City back from the British that same year.

    It is a historic battle between British troops and colonial forces at the end of America’s war for Independence. It was 231 years ago before most Americans were born.

    Pets: Pets are allowed in all outdoor areas of the Fort Stanwix National Monument, except for inside any public-use buildings.

    Camping: Near Fort Stanwix National Monument, there are campsites. They are a great way to experience the nature and history of this site.

    Tour: Fort Stanwix is not just a place to learn about the past. It is also a place for people of any age and background to be able to experience 18th-century life in America. At Fort Stanwix, you can see military drills, weapons demonstrations, or even blacksmithing. There is something for everyone at Fort Stanwix!

    Entrance Fee: You can see Fort Stanwix National Monument for free! And other historic sites in the area. It is free to visit this location and there are no fees to get inside.

    7. Gateway National Recreation Area

    Gateway National Recreation Area

    This is a place where animals can be free and they have lots of places to run. It is called the National Wildlife Refuge.

    A haven for animals! Animals have no other place left like this. People should be happy!

    Gateway National Recreation Area is a place where people can do different things like boating or hiking. There is also the option to camp at night!

    Pets: Dogs are allowed in the Sandy Hook Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area. They must be on a leash and not allowed in any other parts of the park.

    Camping: Gateway National Recreation Area has a variety of camping options. You can choose from tents, RV hookups, or cabin rentals.

    Tour: There are some things to do in the Gateway National Recreation Area. There are tours. You might get lost for a long time without realizing it because there is so much to explore.

    There are lots of things to do during the day. These include things outside. You could fish, hike through the woods, or have a picnic with friends by a waterfall. There is also plenty to do at night like biking and sightseeing under the moonlight.

    Entrance Fee: Gateway National Recreation Area is a free place to go. You do not need tickets here!

    8. General Grant National Memorial

    General Grant National Memorial

    There is a memorial to General Grant in Upper Manhattan. It is a classical dome-shaped building.

    A monument is a place where Ulysses Grant and Julia Dent are buried. It is an honor to them. When America was in trouble, they helped us and we wanted to thank them so we made this monument for them.

    Pets: Pets can’t come inside the General Grant National Memorial. If they do, you’ll have to use your firearm skills and shoot it down before going in!

    Camping: General Grant National Memorial is a place to camp. There are many places near the memorial to camp and they are perfect for people who want to enjoy nature and explore this historic site in Illinois.

    Tour: General Grant National Memorial is a place where you can learn about Ulysses S. Grant’s life story and enjoy educational opportunities for free!

    Entrance Fee: The General Grant National Memorial does not charge a fee to get in and one can walk around the park.

    9. Governors Island National Monument

    Governors Island National Monument

    Governors Island is an island in the middle of New York Harbor. America got it from King George III. It became a national park when there were only 36 states. That was long ago!

    This beautiful natural space has a rich history. Soldiers lived on this land during World War II and they were packed together like sardines because there was not enough housing. Now artists have come to this place, which is called Governors Island, with artwork everywhere.

    Pets: Governors Island does not allow pets. But if you want to take your pet, there is a dog park near the entrance of Governors Bridge.

    Camping: There are no RV campgrounds at Governors Island National Monument or within Manhattan. You can find camping sites on the island of Long Beach in New York Harbor that is operated by the NYC Parks and Recreation department for those who enjoy both beach and city life during vacation time.

    Tour: Governors Island is a fun place. You can go on guided tours or self-guided ones too! You can also walk along the promenade and see some of the views of New York City. The island has lots of history about it that you can learn if you visit our Junior Ranger Program exhibits.

    Entrance Fee: Visiting Governors Island National Monument is a free adventure. You can go with your family. It will be fun and you will have an adventure.

    10. Hamilton Grange National Memorial

    Hamilton Grange National Memorial

    Alexander Hamilton died and wanted to make an important monument for himself. He left most of his estate to do this.

    This mansion was built in honor of America’s first Secretary of the Treasury. It is also a place for people to learn more about how New Yorkers lived back then.

    Pets: Pets are welcome to explore the trails around Hamilton Grange National Memorial. They can run and smell things.

    Camping: The nearest campsite is a long way from here. It’s too far to walk.

    Tour: Alexander Hamilton’s life is on display at his home and National Memorial in New York City. Visitors can tour the grounds, or explore more of Alexander’s legacy through interactive exhibits. You can also relax with friends and family in an open space where nature reigns supreme.

    Entrance Fee: The Hamilton Grange National Memorial offers free entrance. It is open to all who are interested.

    11. Harriet Tubman National Historical Park

    Harriet Tubman National Historical Park

    Harriet Tubman was a famous person in history. She led the Underground Railroad. People say she came from somewhere or that she had been a slave for many years before leading people out of bondage.

    Harriet’s story is recorded and remembered by structures that were important to her life. Some of these structures are photos, but some of them are more than just memories.

    Pets: You can bring your pet to Harriet Tubman National Historical Park. You just have to keep them on a leash. They can explore and smell the flowers, trees, and grass!

    Camping: Some places near Harriet Tubman National Historical Park have campgrounds. If you want to sleep in a tent or sleep in an RV, they have campsites that will work for you.

    Tour: Harriet Tubman National Historical Park is a historic place. People can visit her old plantation and see the trading cards that tell Harriet’s story. Kids can read about it, with help from pictures and text!

    For those who want to learn more about this amazing woman, go to the museum. You’ll find facts that tell you more information about her.

    Entrance Fee: There are no entrance fees to explore the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument. It’s a hidden gem in Maryland with plenty of history and undiscovered sights!

    12. Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site

    Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site

    The Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site preserves the president’s childhood home in Hyde Park, New York. It is where he lived and died when he was 63 years old after having polio.

    This site is in Oyster Bay, which is 60 miles northeast of New York City. It has many presidential sites. The site is near I-495 and Route 9A, which have been called America’s most scenic road.

    Pets: Pets are welcome at the Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site, but they have to stay on a leash and cannot be left alone or tied up while their owners explore other nearby landmarks like FDR’s house and gardens.

    Camping: The Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site is where a US president was born and is now buried. You can camp near this place to stay warm too!

    Tour: The Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site has a lot to offer visitors, including the burial site, Eleanor’s Walk, Farm Lane Trail, Top Cottage Trail, and Visit the Garden at Bellefield. This is where you can see a space gardening exhibit just for kids!

    Entrance Fee: Adults who are 16-61 years old can take the special $10.00 tour of The Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt!

    13. Martin Van Buren National Historic Site

     Martin Van Buren National Historic Site

    The Martin Van Buren National Historic Site is found in Columbia County, New York. It is a unit of the United States National Park Service.

    The house can be found 1 mile south of Kinderhook Village and 125 miles northeast of NYC. It is 20 miles southeast of Albany. The site has been preserved for its historic significance as the one-time home of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s eighth president, who was also known by his nickname “Old Kinderhook.”

    Pets: Pets are allowed at Martin Van Buren NHS, but they must be on a leash. They will never want to leave.

    Camping: Martin Van Buren National Historic Site is a historic site with many other places to camp.

    Tour: The Martin Van Buren National Historic Site offers a lot of tours and events. They are available all year round. New additions to the offerings are added every month. You can find recreation opportunities in nearby towns like Kinderhook or Valatie – there’s something for everyone!

    Entrance Fee: Martin Van Buren National Historic Site is a place where you can learn about history. There are no entry fees.

    14. Saint Paul’s Church National Historic Site

    Saint Paul’s Church National Historic Site

    Saint Paul’s Church National Historic Site is a United States National Historic Site in Mount Vernon. It is in New York.

    A government-approved group was able to protect Saint Paul’s church from an increase in industrialization. This would have ruined the church and made it not accessible for everyone to enjoy it.

    Pets: Visitors are not allowed to bring their pets or guns on the grounds of Saint Paul’s Church National Historic Site.

    Camping: Saint Paul’s Church National Historic Site is just five minutes from the campsites. You can stay at these campsites and explore the area.

    Tour: Saint Paul’s Church National Historic Site is a popular place for tourists and locals to visit. You can see the church by yourself, or you can take a tour. Tours are available in many languages.

    Entrance Fee: Saint Paul’s Church National Historic Site is a great place to visit for free. The site has no entrance fee and it stays warm all year round. It is also perfect for any time of the year, meaning that you can come at any time.

    15. Sagamore Hill National Historic Site

    Sagamore Hill National Historic Site

    A place named Sagamore Hill is in New York. It was Theodore Roosevelt’s house. He lived there from 1885 to 1919 and died on January 6th, 1919. George Westinghouse Jr helped build it by giving $50,000 for the building it.

    The family-owned the property and they have preserved it since 1962. They still let people come and see it.

    Pets: Visitors can visit Sagamore Hill anytime they want. Bring your dog and have a walk in the 83 acres of beautiful grounds!

    Camping: Sagamore Hill is a place where people can stay and sleep in tents. They can also hike through history!

    Tour: Look for animals like foxes, deer, and wild turkeys. You might see them. If you do, don’t bother them and don’t walk on the ground where there could be Indian arrowheads or other things.

    Entrance Fee: Sagamore Hill National Historic Site is a popular place for people to go on vacation. It is not very expensive and costs only $10.00 per adult!

    16. Saratoga National Historical Park

    Saratoga National Historical Park

    Saratoga National Historical Park is a place where the American Revolution was won. The Americans and the French helped each other. They all wanted independence from Great Britain.

    The park preserves the site of one of America’s great battles during the War Between Britain and the Colonies.

    Pets: People can bring their pets to Sagamore Hill National Historic Site. They should keep them on a leash and in areas where they won’t bother other people or animals.

    Camping: Sagamore Hill National Historic Site has good camping sites. These are perfect for a getaway or an outing with your family.

    Tour: Sagamore Hill National Historic Site is open to the public. You can go biking, hiking, or climbing. Some tours show inside Philip Schuyler’s home.

    Entrance Fee: The National Historic Site is a free place for everyone to visit. You can see Sagamore Hill, which was George Washington’s home. It has beautiful natural views and it is a good time.

    17. Statue of Liberty National Monument

    Statue of Liberty National Monument

    The Statue of Liberty was a gift to America from France. The person who designed the Statue of Liberty was French, and it was built with metal from people who were French. It is on an island in New York City called “Liberty Island” that used to be called “Bedloe’s Island”.

    The statue has a torch in its hand. The goddess is giving light so that people can find enlightenment and freedom. You see the date 1776 on her left hand. This tells you when America got its independence from Britain and what America wants- freedom under the law.

    Millions of people visit the Statue of Liberty every year because it means different things to them. Some people say it means freedom, democracy, peace, and hope.

    Many countries have used Liberty on their stamps. France’s inscription reads, “Liberty enlightening all Nations.”

    Pets: People can’t bring pets with them to Ellis Island or Liberty Island. This is because they might break animals’ homes and make other people’s experiences bad.

    Camping: Visiting the Statue of Liberty is a good idea. But camping is not allowed there.

    Tour: You can see the Statue of Liberty in a lot of different ways. You can learn about its past, like what France gave to America. You can also see what it will be like in the future with new buildings being built on top of it. The Statue of Liberty Museum tells you about the statue. There are items from other countries too. It is fun to watch construction going on at her feet.

    Entrance Fee: The Statue of Liberty is a symbol of freedom. You can’t go in but you can take the ferry, which costs $12 or more depending on if you are over 62 years old.

    18. Stonewall National Monument

    Stonewall National Monument

    This is a national monument in New York. The monument is 7.7 acres big and it is in the West Village area of Greenwich Village, New York City.

    This building was originally a Quaker meeting house. Later, it was turned into a post office. Then the land became part of America’s first federally protected LGBT historic site.

    Pets: Stonewall National Monument has a strict pet policy. You can’t bring pets on the property unless they are service animals. But there is one exception to this rule: service animals!

    Camping: No RV camping is allowed at the monument, but there are campgrounds across the Hudson River. The monument is open year-round!

    Tour: The Stonewall National Monument is a monument in New York City that was built to honor the 1969 Stonewall Riots. The Monument has an education resource center for people to learn more about it, as well as exhibits and virtual tours. It is important because it honors LGBTQ history.

    Entrance Fee: Stonewall National Monument is a landmark in New York City. People can go there for free to explore its history and gay rights activism.

    19. Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site

    Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site

    Theodore Roosevelt was the 26th President of the U.S. He was born in a place called New York City. The National Park Service built this replica for all to see what it looked like when he was born and grew up there.

    The Teddy Bear Statue was built to honor America’s first bear. He lived there from 1858-1860 while he and his family rented an apartment on Bond Street. Today, the address is 3rd Ave near 21st street.

    Pets: Teddy Roosevelt’s birthplace is a place where you can go and see what it was like to grow up in the Gilded Age. You are not allowed to bring pets inside, but this place feels warm and welcoming. There are lots of cozy chairs and Teddy Roosevelt’s favorite reading spot by the fireplace.

    Camping: Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site offers places for people to camp.

    Tour: Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site is a special place. People can visit the park, take a tour of Teedie’s house, get their passport stamp when they enter one of our five themed gardens, or attend programming on topics like “Family Matters.”

    Entrance Fee: The place where Teddy Roosevelt was born is free to visit. It is open on weekdays and weekends and you can see where he was born as well as other historical sites in nearby Oyster Bay.

    20. Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site

     Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site

    The Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site is a museum and historic site that preserves the Ansley Wilcox House in Buffalo.

    This house was the place where McKinley’s successor took an oath of office.

    Pets: That’s right, dogs are not allowed in the house or gardens at Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site. However, they do allow pets!

    Camping: Theodore Roosevelt National Historic Site has some really good campsites. Hiking trails are in the area, and wildlife is abundant. You can see views from all angles when you are here.

    Tour: Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site in Buffalo is hosting events this month. You can attend single-date walking tours, lectures, and other indoor activities such as the Victorian Christmas. There are also outdoor activities like a Delaware Avenue tour or an Allentown Art Festival next door. There are so many things to do here!

    Entrance Fee: This is a place where you can walk around and see things. It costs $30 to go in with two adults and any children who are 18 years old or younger.

    21. Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site

    Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site

    The Vanderbilt Mansion is a historic house museum in Hyde Park, New York. It’s important and it became one of the first national landmarks when President Franklin D Roosevelt created the program over 80 years ago.

    A rich man in the 1800s had this house-made. He wanted it to be his summer home. You’ll see marble fireplaces and other things from Europe in this house once called the finest country estate on Long Island.

    Pets: Pets are allowed on the Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site. The site is famous for its opulent interiors and gardens, and both of these are pet-friendly!

    Camping: You’ll find the best campsites near Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site if you take a look around and explore.

    Tour: A trip to Vanderbilt Mansion will not only introduce you to the lavish life of an American tycoon but also provide a glimpse into what early 20th-century society in America was like. Once inside your entrance fee includes access to all parts of the property including gardens and even off-site tours!

    Entrance Fee: Visitors to the Vanderbilt Mansion need to pay $10. That includes a tour of the historic site.

    22. Women’s Rights National Historical Park

    Women’s Rights National Historical Park

    Women’s Rights National Historical Park is a place where American history happened and is the home of America’s first Women’s Rights Convention. In the 20th century, it became clear that women had been denied educational opportunities because they were not allowed into universities like Harvard University.

    The movement for gender empowerment started with this convention. You can also see it in other reform movements that happened during the late 19th Century, such as prison abolitionism and temperance activism. These are also recognized at Woman Suffrage Memorial Garden on site!

    Pets: Pets are welcome at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park. But only if they have permission from a ranger.

    Camping: The Women’s Rights National Historical Park is a place to remember the fight for equality. But you can’t camp there because it is not allowed. There are other places nearby where you can camp, though.

    Tour: The Women’s Rights National Historical Park is a must-see for every history buff. With three historic sites, there are plenty of places to explore and learn about the suffrage movement in Seneca Falls! Visitors can make their way through Wesleyan Chapel, The Waterwall at Declaration Park, or Elizabeth Cady Stanton House with an interactive Junior Ranger program available too.

    Entrance Fee: Women have rights in America. Women can come to the park and explore it. There are no fees for visitors.

    New York is a place that has something for everyone. There are lots of different things to do. If you want to take a break from city life and have some time in nature, then come see one of our national parks!

    We have many opportunities to go outside. We can hike through valleys and climb up cliffs, or take a boat tour down the Rio Grande River. Come see what we have to offer before it is gone for good!